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Board of Directors Election Bios 2018
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K-8 Representative Nominees

Lisa Bohaty
K-5 Computer Science Teacher | Lincoln Public Schools | Lincoln, Nebraska, USA

I believe that all students can and should be given a chance to learn computer science. Computer science teaches students problem solving and critical thinking skills. These are some the top job skills that students will need for their future. I believe that students learn best through passion, projects, peers and play. When students are allowed to explore their passion into their projects they control their learning. I incorporate play into my classroom with robots and physical computing.

What experiences and/or interests in K–12 CS/information technology (IT) education qualify you to serve as a leader for the organization?
I teach computer science to students in grades Kindergarten through fifth grades. I teach computational thinking, problem solving and creativity skills. I am a classroom teacher who became a computer science teacher so I have firsthand experiences to help other teachers learn computer science. I have a strong passion for computer science!

What previous experience do you have with CSTA?
I am a member of CSTA and active in my local chapter. I have been a member of CSTA for two years. Last summer I won a Rolls Royce Scholarship to attend CSTA in Baltimore. I learned so much from other fellow computer science teachers. I often participate in weekly twitter chats and love to sharing and learn from other educators around the world.

What leadership skills do you have that would enrich the Board and the organization?
I am a strong teacher who loves to lead others. I enjoy sharing my skills and helping others learn new skills. I am a Google Certified Trainer and often present at conferences and trainings. This summer I am leading Code Camps for teachers to expand their understanding of computer science and some of the curriculum available for K-12 students.

What do you think are the most important issues for K–12 CS education?
Computer Science is one of the fastest growing fields and yet there are many jobs that go unfilled because students do not have these skills. I think the most important issue right now is that computer science is not a universally accepted curriculum and many schools do not offer courses. I want to help change this where all students can learn CS.

 

Kristeen Shabram
Business and Technology Teacher | Westside Middle School – Westside Community Schools | Omaha, Nebraska, USA

I am passionate about helping students develop a solid foundation of computer science knowledge. To achieve this, teachers need access to the latest research, tools, and curriculum in computer science education, as well as professional development opportunities to learn best practices when teaching computer science. I look forward to sharing my passion for computer science education, helping teachers develop innovative curriculum, and bringing enthusiasm and creativity to our organization.

What experiences and/or interests in K–12 CS/information technology (IT) education qualify you to serve as a leader for the organization?
I am passionate about helping students develop a solid foundation of computer science knowledge. To achieve this, teachers need access to the latest research, tools, and curriculum in computer science education, as well as professional development opportunities to learn best practices when teaching computer science. I look forward to sharing my passion for computer science education, helping teachers develop innovative curriculum, and bringing enthusiasm and creativity to our organization.

What previous experience do you have with CSTA?
I have been an active member of the Metro Omaha CSTA Chapter for five years. I have served as Vice President, and I am currently in my second year as Chapter President. At the 2017 CSTA Conference in Baltimore, I participated in the Chapter Leadership Summit. Currently, I am serving as a member of the 2018 CSTA Conference Planning Committee.

What leadership skills do you have that would enrich the Board and the organization?
Achiever is one of my strengths from the Gallup StrengthsFinder. I take pride in goal setting and organizing steps to achieve these goals. As a team member, I am motivated to work hard to complete any task that moves the team closer to achieving success. My drive and determination are my inspiration to push forward when encountering challenges.

What do you think are the most important issues for K–12 CS education?
The first issue is the need for diversity in computer science, specifically the recruitment of girls. We need to develop innovative strategies that motivate girls to explore computer science. The second issue is developing computational thinking skills among students. These skills help students develop a foundation of computer science knowledge.

 

9-12 Representative Nominees

Amy Fox
Computer Science Teacher | Valhalla UFSD – Valhalla High School | White Plains, New York, USA

Since 1993 I have been a computer science teacher in a few very different types of school districts: rural, urban and suburban, each with its own set of issues. Yet all had the same basic challenges. Each faced low enrollment, especially with girls and minorities. A consistent goal for me has been to turn all of that around. With hard work & dedication I have developed a robust set of HS courses as well as a K-12 curriculum. We now have 15+% of our population enrolled, 25% girls, 15% minorities.

What experiences and/or interests in K–12 CS/information technology (IT) education qualify you to serve as a leader for the organization?
I've been a CS teacher for 25 years - everything from elementary school after school club to HS introductory courses to AP CS A and at the college level. I've built up our HS CS offerings over the last 9 years and in the last 3 led an excellent team of technology teachers to write a K-12 district CS strand aligned to CSK-12 Framework and CSTA Stds.

What previous experience do you have with CSTA?
I've been a member of the CSTA for many years and in 2015 founded the Lower Hudson Valley Chapter in NY. As chapter President, I hold monthly meetings, co-organize an annual CSTA Student Tech Expo/Contest, and worked with BOCES to facilitate CS PD to all K-12 teachers in the region. Through CSTA many otherwise isolated teachers can now collaborate.

What leadership skills do you have that would enrich the Board and the organization?
Probably my best leadership skills are organization, an ability to see the big picture as well as be detail oriented, time management, knowing when and how to delegate, and the ability to make a sometimes difficult decision. I use all of these skills in the various positions I have both in school as well as with the CSTA Chapter.

What do you think are the most important issues for K–12 CS education?
Some of the most important issues facing CS education are interest, equity, and availability. From my experience, all of these can be addressed with a simple, yet challenging to implement, solution. ALL students need to be exposed to CS concepts and taught computational thinking skills early on. Our K-12 strand is successfully addressing each issue.

 

Chinma Uche
Math and Computer Science Teacher | Academy of Aerospace and Engineering | West Hartford, Connecticut, USA

I have been privileged to serve in the CSTA Board as the 9-12 rep and I ask for your support to continue to serve. While in the Board, I served in the PD and Chapters Committees. As a fellow classroom teacher, I understand the need to excite students with CS and the important work teachers do to that effect. The changing CS landscape requires access to quality PD opportunities to enable teachers to continue to grow and to meet the needs of their students. I will serve to the best of my ability.  

What experiences and/or interests in K–12 CS/information technology (IT) education qualify you to serve as a leader for the organization?
As a CS teacher since 2002 (with hands-on experience of Scratch, Snap, App Inventor, Alice, Pencil Code and App Lab), a Code.org Fundamentals Facilitator, co-PI of the Mobile CSP project, AP CSP Consultant, and a CSTA chapter president, I work with and advocate for teachers. I have also led teacher workshops and made presentations at conferences.

What previous experience do you have with CSTA?
I have served CSTA as a member of the 2008 cohort of CS Advocacy Leadership Team (CSALT) representing Connecticut, a chapter president since 2009 (CTCSTA) and a member of the CSTA 2015 - 2016 Standards Revision Task Force. I currently serve as the 9-12 rep on the CSTA Board. In these, I always promoted the vision of CSTA and advocated for teachers.

What leadership skills do you have that would enrich the Board and the organization?
As CTCSTA president, I have worked with many stakeholders in promoting respect for teachers and valuing teachers’ time. I will bring to the Board a diverse perspective as a high school classroom teacher, and a PD facilitator for K-12 teachers, and as a chapter president. I have a good relationship with our HE colleagues and K-12 curriculum providers.

What do you think are the most important issues for K–12 CS education?
The CS community has, through its advocacy efforts, brought into the CS classroom students with varying levels of need/experience. Teachers need preparation to meet students' need while maintaining engagement. The community needs to continue to cherish the values of Inclusion, Diversity, Equity and Access while continuing to care for its members.

 

International Representative Nominees

Miles Berry
Principal Lecturer in Computing Education | University of Roehampton | Roehampton, London, UK

I would consider it an honour to serve CSTA's members as part of its board for a further two-year term, ensuring a clear and effective voice for teachers in promoting CS education worldwide.


  • Member of Computing At School board

  • Member of BCS Academy of Computing board
  • Member of Raspberry Pi Foundation

  • 18 years’ experience as a teacher, including three as a head teacher
  • 8+ years’ experience in initial teacher training
  • International curriculum development, PD and consultancy work

What experiences and/or interests in K–12 CS/information technology (IT) education qualify you to serve as a leader for the organization?

  • Long experience as an IT and computing teacher

  • An international reputation in training new and established teachers to teach computing

  • Particular commitment to an inclusive approach to computing education

  • Curriculum design and resource development experience (national curriculum, Barefoot, Switched On Computing, Quickstart Computing)

What previous experience do you have with CSTA?

  • Serving on board as international rep.
  • Serving on executive committee, professional development committee and international sub-committee
  • Articles for The Voice and Advocate blog.
  • Attended 2016 conference and spoke at 2017 conference
  • International reviewer for CS K12 framework
  • Promotion of CSTA initiatives internationally

What leadership skills do you have that would enrich the Board and the organization?

  • MBA in education management
  • Experience as a school leader, community manager and manager in a university
  • Experience in not-for-profit sector governance
  • Project management (CAS TV, Project Quantum, Hello World)
  • Work with policymakers and senior officials in UK and abroad
  • Active across a range of social media: @mberry, milesberry.net

What do you think are the most important issues for K–12 CS education?

  • Professional development - quality, value and coherence
  • Resource development, particularly for novice teachers of CS
  • Formative assessment, drawing on both projects and questions
  • Inclusion and diversity: gender, socio-economic disadvantage, ethnicity, special educational needs
  • Promoting CS education at local and school level

 

Jason Zagami
Lecturer | Griffith University | Southport, Queensland, Australia

Elect an Australian CS/IT educator with a passion for maturing CS/IT education to the equivalent of science education in K-12 schools globally, and willing to contribute and support an international perspective to CSTA to help make this happen. An Australian contribution, emphasizing simplicity, fairness and fun, coupled with many years’ experience in bettering CS/IT education can help provide the diversity needed for creative solutions to the many challenges and opportunities in CS/IT education.

What experiences and/or interests in K–12 CS/information technology (IT) education qualify you to serve as a leader for the organization?
K-12 Teacher of CS/IT for 15 years then Researcher/Teacher Educator of CS/IT for last 12 years. Written two different state CS curricula and been involved in developing an Australian compulsory K-10 CS curriculum. President for state (QSITE) and national (ACCE) CS/IT teacher associations and edit the Australian Educational Computing journal.

What previous experience do you have with CSTA?
I have been a member of CSTA since international membership became available (2005?), and have made various contributions to CSTA Curriculum development and policy formation. Hosted CSTA executives on study tours to Australia, and led CS/IT study tours for Australian CS/IT educators to the USA and Canada to share and learn from each other.

What leadership skills do you have that would enrich the Board and the organization?
20+ years on state, national and international CS/IT boards, curriculum development, and CS/IT education research, brings a rich international perspective on CS/IT education, with experience in bringing together states to form a national approach that can be applied towards supporting the development of an international approach to CS/IT education.

What do you think are the most important issues for K–12 CS education?
Moving beyond introductory activities in CS/IT education, the lack of information focused learning activities, re-engaging with a deeper conceptualization of computational thinking beyond the problem-solving process to building relationships between students and digital machines, and addressing the gender impact of abstraction over relationships.

 

State Department Representative Nominees

Anthony Owen
State Director of Computer Science | Arkansas Department of Education | Bryant, Arkansas, USA

As a result of Governor Hutchinson’s vision for computer science, I, with the support of many local and national partners, have been able to lead Arkansas’s initiative to the forefront of computer science (CS) education. It is with great enthusiasm that I submit my application to continue serving the national CS teacher community as the State Department Representative to the CSTA Board of Directors for the next term. I look forward to continuing this opportunity to further CS education for all!

What experiences and/or interests in K–12 CS/information technology (IT) education qualify you to serve as a leader for the organization?
Since 2015, I have been blessed as the Arkansas Director of Computer Science to serve in a manner that ours has become nationally recognized as a leading state in CS education. I have assisted numerous entities in developing standards, writing for the K-12 Community Framework, and by providing state strategic planning and implementation guidance.

What previous experience do you have with CSTA?
Serving on the board has allowed me to help enact policies and actions that directly benefit the membership and assist in the creating greater financial stability for CSTA. I also work closely with the CSTA–AR chapter to promote and organize state events. I also serve on the Executive Committee and as an Advocacy Committee Board Liaison.

What leadership skills do you have that would enrich the Board and the organization?
I have developed the ability to work effectively with a team; a strong work ethic; an ability to resourcefully brave tasks outside my normal job; an ability to absorb, disaggregate, and make timely yet informed decisions based on data; an exceptional technological prowess; and a passion to champion laudable organizational missions and values.

What do you think are the most important issues for K–12 CS education?
Now that efforts are becoming more unified among the leaders in CS education, CSTA has an opportunity, through our great network of chapters and teachers, to assist bringing lagging areas along for the good of our students and world. This can be done through grassroots efforts of passionate educators that make up the CSTA membership!  

 

At-Large Representative Nominees

Michelle Lagos
Computer Science Department Head / High School Computer Science Teacher | American School of Tegucigalpa | Tegucigalpa, Francisco Morazan, Honduras

18 years as a CS Teacher have taught me that the CS ED community worldwide shares many things. While on the CSTA’s board of directors I’ve been able to encourage girls to get involved in CS, gotten quality professional development, and collaborated with teachers globally. CSTA provides resources, collaboration, sharing experiences and understanding how improving CS ED worldwide is empowering and life changing. I’d feel honored to be able to keep on working on supporting CS teachers worldwide.

What experiences and/or interests in K–12 CS/information technology (IT) education qualify you to serve as a leader for the organization?
Over 18 years I’ve taught CS to all K-12 divisions, currently 9-12, CS Dept. Head, Core Leadership team analyzing the current curriculum, making improvement proposals. Member of STEM committee creating a school wide STEM program, Robotics club Coordinator, oversee the Academic tech. budget and work with staff integrating technology in the classroom.

What previous experience do you have with CSTA?

International Rep. (2012-2014) worked with:

Curriculum committee
K-8 committee
Chaired the International committee
Computational thinking task force
Writer on the CSTA advocacy blog
Was a presenter at the conference

Rep. at Large (2016-2018) working with:

IDEA committee
Member engagement committee
The board’s executive committee

What leadership skills do you have that would enrich the Board and the organization?
Leadership positions at my school and with the CSTA board have helped in understanding the commitment it implies, often achieving our goals. Taking responsibility as well as delegating some tasks when recognizing what the individuals bring to the table. Sometimes asking the hard questions for the benefit of the team.

What do you think are the most important issues for K–12 CS education?
Helping administrators, educators, parents and students understand what CS implies. It is a common belief that K-12 CS is learning application computing. By defining CS’s scope clearly and shedding light on its integration with other courses, we can achieve a better level of understanding leading to more inclusion, diversity, equality and support.

 

Emmanuel Schanzer
Co-Director, Bootstrap | Brown University | Alexandria, Virginia, USA

I believe that the success of CS Education will be measured on three axes: Equity, Scale and Rigor. Getting every kid "coding" is useless if they don't *learn* anything. Rigorous CS classes in every school is great, but not if the only kids who sign up are rich white boys. A brilliant teacher who gets a diverse class to pass the AP is wonderful, but can't be scaled. Getting one of these is easy. Two of these is hard. My mission is to work for all three.

What experiences and/or interests in K–12 CS/information technology (IT) education qualify you to serve as a leader for the organization?
I've been a public high school teacher and middle school academic coach. I've run a national afterschool program, and founded Bootstrap. I hold degrees and have professional experience in both CS and Educational research. I am the director of CSPdWeek, and regularly work across the CS-Ed community.

What previous experience do you have with CSTA?
I've attended every CSTA conference since 2009, and have presented at most of them. I co-chair the PD Steering Committee, and was instrumental in providing strategic feedback about the PD Pipeline.

What leadership skills do you have that would enrich the Board and the organization?
I've demonstrated the ability to build consensus across the CS Ed community about a diverse range of topics. Between my duties as co-chair of the PD Steering Committee, director of CSPdWeek, and moderator of the CS Education Discussion forum, I've consistently been able to bring groups together and find common ground.

What do you think are the most important issues for K–12 CS education?
CS Education has a credibility problem right now. For too long, our community has pushed CS for CS's sake, expecting people to jump on without real evidence of rigor or transfer. At the same time, there is a perception that CS-Ed is a Trojan horse for Silicon Valley. Justified or not, CSTA must work to address these perceptions.

 

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